Here’s the thing, we need a new kind of data store, a new kind of SQL, something that does for storing and querying large amounts of data what SQL did for normalized data. Sure you can store a lot of data in a relational database, but when I say large, I mean really large; a billion or more records. I know we need this because I keep seeing people build it.

The ubiquity of frustrating, unhelpful software interfaces has motivated decades of research into “Human-Computer Interaction.” In this paper, I suggest that the long-standing focus on “interaction” may be misguided. For a majority subset of software, called “information software,” I argue that interactivity is actually a curse for users and a crutch for designers, and users’ goals can be better satisfied through other means.

It became clear to me that the best solution for text was to use a combination of a serif and a sans that derive directly from each other. The only remaining question was which combination of serif and sans could meet this criterium?

I have spent many years working on the FreeBSD kernel, and only rarely did I venture into userland programming, but when I had occasion to do so, I invariably found that people programmed like it was still 1975.